RATINGS: A = must own B = buy it C= average D = yawn F = puke

George Thorogood and the Destroyers – Debut & Move It On Over
Rounder Records
http://www.rounder.com/artists/george-thorogood-and-the-destroyers

Rating: B+

Lonesome George hit the American rock and roll scene with George Thorogood and the Delaware Destroyers and showed teenage American white boys the power of the black blues…performed by a white boy from the upper north eastern part of the country.  It was an odd mix but it worked.  George had the look, the voice and the right kind of guitar.  More importantly he had the songs, both originals and classic remakes. 

Thorogood brought tunes like John Lee Hooker’s “House Rent Boogie/One Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer” to the masses.  He was a young blues archeologist paying homage to his heroes Earl Hooker, Elmore James and Robert Johnson.  He dusted off the blues, added a tad of distortion and blasted the tunes out all the while using his God given gravely voice to accent the music.  The result was an instant hit. 

His next album was more of the same as the title track; “Move It On Over” was a cover of a Hank Williams song.  George was doing to the classic country tune what he did to classic blues tracks.  This album was all remakes as George didn’t write a note.  Instead it featured songs by Chuck Berry, Elmore James, Bo Diddley, Willie Dixon, Brownie McGee and Homesick James Williamson.  The music was a hit and the formula is still working for Thorogood all these years later.

Rounder Records has re-released these albums and digitally remastered them from the original analog tapes using DSD and Super Bit Mapping.  The result is crystal clear renditions of these classic George Thorogood albums circa 1977 and 1978. 

Crank ‘em up, roll the top down on the car and hit the Strip baby!  Teach those youngsters out there that real music consists of more than beats and detuned guitars and that it’s okay to play happy good time music that rocks!

Can I get an ‘Amen’!?

By Jeb Wright

Comments

 

The views of the comments below are not necessarily those of Classic Rock Revisited