RATINGS: A = must own B = buy it C= average D = yawn F = puke

Billy Thorpe – East of Eden’s Gate
Rock Candy Records

http://www.rockcandyrecords.com/

Rating: B

Billy Thorpe came to prominence in the late 1970’s with the massive FM radio success of the song “Children of the Sun.”  The song appeared to put him on the fast track for success, but the label he was on, Capricorn, had financial problems and folded, leaving the song and the album it was on drifting away into outer space.

In 1982, Thorpe went into the studio and recorded the album East of Eden’s Gate.  The album had the promise of being Thorpe’s masterpiece.  The music was at times, ethereal, yet contained enough of a hard rock, melodic base to make it relevant in the day’s musical landscape.

East of Eden’s Gate was produced by Spencer Proffer, who was riding high on the success he had producing Quiet Riot’s Metal Health. Thorpe had an all-star cast that included QR’s drummer Frankie Banali and David Bowie guitarist Earl Slick. Together they created a complete and well-polished rock album.

The title track is a true epic cut that exemplifies the energy and talent Thorpe was in possession of at the time.  The best tune, “Dogs of War” makes this worth the purchase price all by itself.

Rock Candy Records did a masterful job making the album sound excellent.  They also added a full color booklet, a 3,500 word essay, and photos.

The world lost Billy Thorpe in 2007, but Rock Candy Records has paid proper homage to the singer/songwriter/guitarist by giving love to this forgotten album, demonstrating that while “Children of the Sun” is why he will be remembered best, other albums, especially East of Eden’s Gate, show he was much more than a one hit wonder.

Track listing:

1. East Of Eden’s Gate
2. Edge Of Madness
3. Hold On To Your Dream
4. While You’re Still Young
5. No Show Tonight
6. I Can’t Stand It
7. Nite Rites
8. Crusin’ (The Town In The Heat Of The Night)
9. Dogs Of War (Flesh And Blood)

By Jeb Wright

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