RATINGS: A = must own B = buy it C= average D = yawn F = puke

Lou Gramm – Long Hard Look
Rock Candy Records

www.rockcandyrecords.com

Rating: B

Lou Gramm came to fame as the voice of the rock band Foreigner.  Widely regarded as one of the best voices of his generation, Gramm and Foreigner owned the world of rock and roll in the late ‘70s and early ‘80s.

Foreigner became more known for ballads than rockers towards the end of their hey-day, something that paid the bills but bothered Gramm.

He stepped outside the group and released a wonderful solo album titled Ready or Not and had a big hit with “Midnight Blue.”  That album paved the way for Lou to record and release a second solo effort; the one reviewed here, Long Hard Look.

Gramm went into the studio with in-demand producer Peter Wolf, and together, the men crafted a bluesy rock sound that fit Gramm’s voice to a tee.

Joining Lou on the album is bassist Bruce Turgon from Gramm’s band Black Sheep, the group he left to join Foreigner.  His brother, Ben Gramm, is on drums and guitarists Nils Lofgren and Vivian Campbell rounded out the band ensuring this album would rock.

Gramm’s performance on this album is very strong.  Although the album failed to have a huge hit single, this album, start to finish, is much stronger than his first solo effort.  This is a great collection of songs, well written and well performed.

The album has been fully remastered from 24 BIT digital technology and includes a 16 page booklet, complete with a new interview from Lou Gramm.

While Lou didn’t re-invent the wheel with this album, he didn’t need to.  What he did instead was be true to himself and let his bluesy side show.  The result is a fine album worthy of seeing the light of day once again.

Track Listing:
Angel with a Dirty Face | Just Between You and Me | Broken Dreams | True Blue Love | I’ll Come Running | Hangin’ on My Hip | Warmest Rising Sun | Day One | I’ll Know When It’s Over | Tin Soldier

By Jeb Wright

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