RATINGS: A = must own B = buy it C= average D = yawn F = puke

Candice Night – Reflections
UDR Music

http://www.udr-music.com/

Rating: B

Candice Night, long before she became guitar god Ritchie Blackmore’s bride and formed Blackmore’s Night, was a rocker chick. In fact, she met The Man in Black when she worked for a rock radio station. They two discovered they also loved Renaissance music and had the talent, chops and financial ability to go in that direction.

Now, fifteen years of lutes, flutes and performing at castles around the globe later, the band has reached the top of their genre.

Candice, a very creative and emotional woman, took time to stretch her wings and leave her love of Renaissance music and create popular rock oriented songs.

This is a far cry from hard rock, yet there are some rockers in the mix, along with some heartfelt ballads. The important thing is that Ms. Night is taking musical risks and reaching out beyond her comfort zone. The result is a very contemporary, easy going album.

In the USA the first single is “Call It Love” which seems more radio friendly than the single in Europe, “Gone, Gone, Gone” which is actually the better song.

Fans of Blackmore’s Night will love hearing Candy in another setting. Hard rock fans of Ritchie Blackmore won’t find it as intriguing, yet it is worth checking out.

Candice does not completely abandon her Renaissance success as the tunes “Black Rose” and “Now and Then 2011” both give a bit of nod to that style. “For You” is a great Celtic tune.

For her first foray into the music world on her own, Candice has done a nice job. The music is easy to listen to and the tunes are catchy.

Now that she has taken time out for a solo project Classic Rock Revisited thinks she should allow her hubby to take a crack at another Rainbow album.

She could be the opener on the tour with Blackmore’s Night up second and Rainbow closing the show. Hmm, sounds like one hell of a night of music!

By Jeb Wright

Comments

 

The views of the comments below are not necessarily those of Classic Rock Revisited